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Works of Art and Clocks

Sculptures

The vast majority of sculpture that passes through our auction rooms tend to date from the 19th century, frequently taking their inspiration from ancient Greek and Roman objects and quite often directly copying pieces housed in museums and private collections. Greek mythology, in particular, has always provided a wide range of subjects from Venus, Zeus and Diana to Cupid and Mercury.

A Franz Bergman cold painted bronze model of a lizard, with yellow, green and blue
            body, its head looking skyward and its tail curled round under its head, stamped
            with Bergman vase stamp, ‘Geschutzt’ and numbered 4133, total length 54cm was offered
            in our October 2009 Fine Sale realising £1,550 (FS4/622).

A Franz Bergman cold painted bronze model of a lizard, with yellow, green and blue body, its head looking skyward and its tail curled round under its head, stamped with Bergman vase stamp, ‘Geschutzt’ and numbered 4133, total length 54cm was offered in our October 2009 Fine Sale realising £1,550 (FS4/622).

The sculptures themselves may be indoor or outdoor works of art, produced either in marble, stone, bronze, steel or spelter. The pieces can be abstract or formal; and may reflect a particular period, movement or school of art.

Religion has also provided a wealth of subjects that have influenced the sculptor's art. Subjects that have come up for sale include bronze studies of Christ at the Column and the Crucifixion, along with continental carved wooden and polychrome decorated figures of Saints.

France, Italy, Germany and Austria were possibly the greatest producers of bronze figures from the 1850s onwards, with sculptors adapting to the tastes of the growing affluent classes borne out of industrialisation. Animals became increasingly popular as the century progressed with cats, dogs, farm animals and, above all, horses being frequent subjects.

Sculptures from the classical to the Belle Époque, from Art Nouveau through to Art Deco have all been offered for sale at auction through the Works of Art and Clocks department.

Notable pieces of sculpture sold at auction through the department incude Cousteau's Marly Horses, Bergmann's cold painted bronze models, Frediand Preiss' Con Brio and Demetre Chiparus' Fish Dancer.

Specialists

Martin McIlroyMartin McIlroy
Department Head

Leigh ExtenceLeigh Extence
Clock Consultant