Skip To Content



Your privacy is important. Our Cookies Statement explains how we use cookies on this site. You can change their use at any time. You accept them by continuing to use this site. Our Privacy Statement explains how we use and protect your data.

John Dawes (d 1845)

Biography of English clockmaker John Dawes (d 1845)

John Dawes (d 1845) was an English clockmaker.

The Dawes family were well-known clockmakers in Whitehaven, John Dawes having moved to the town from Ulverston circa 1818 where he had married Margaret Walker in 1792 with their son James born in 1807.

Dawes' first working address in Whitehaven was 8 Roper Street in circa 1828. He then moved to 4 Queen Street before a move to number 16.

Dawes remarried in 1842 to Mary Ward, his first wife having died. This second marriage was short-lived as Mary was to die tragically whilst hanging out the washing at their new home on the Old Quay when a gust of wind blew her into the sea and she drowned.

Dawes' son James left his father in 1838 to set up on his own account at 31 King Street, where he married Margaret Duggin in 1849.

John Dawes died in 1845.

His son, James Dawes, disappears from directories in the 1860s, presumably having died by then.

Related Departments

Related Fine Art Categories

John Dawes (d 1845) Related Lots

No Image of Lot Available

Lot FS22/828: Dawes, Whitehaven, A Mahogany Wall Regulator

Dawes, Whitehaven, a mahogany wall regulator the weight-driven, eight-day duration movement having five-spoke wheelwork, an off-set pendulum crutch, half-dead beat escapement, maintaining power and a wood rod to the pendulum, the seventeen-inch round painted dial having black Roman numerals, a subsidiary seconds dial, blued steel hands and signed by the maker Dawes, Whitehaven, the false plate embossed with the dial maker's name Finnemore, Birmingham, the teardrop shaped mahogany case with a round top, ebony and boxwood stringing to the base, oval floral inlay to the top of the trunk and cross banding to the shaped door, height: 171 cm.

Estimate: £800 - £1,000
Realised: £720